Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Restricted access

Mammalian choices: combining fast-but-inaccurate and slow-but-accurate decision-making systems

Pete C Trimmer

Pete C Trimmer

Department of Computer Science, University of BristolWoodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB, UK

[email protected]

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

,
Alasdair I Houston

Alasdair I Houston

School of Biological Sciences, University of BristolWoodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

,
James A.R Marshall

James A.R Marshall

Department of Computer Science, University of BristolWoodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

,
Rafal Bogacz

Rafal Bogacz

Department of Computer Science, University of BristolWoodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UB, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

,
Elizabeth S Paul

Elizabeth S Paul

Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of BristolLangford House, Langford BS40 5DU, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

,
Mike T Mendl

Mike T Mendl

Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, University of BristolLangford House, Langford BS40 5DU, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

and
John M McNamara

John M McNamara

School of Mathematics, University of BristolUniversity Walk, Bristol BS8 1TW, UK

Google Scholar

Find this author on PubMed

    Empirical findings suggest that the mammalian brain has two decision-making systems that act at different speeds. We represent the faster system using standard signal detection theory. We represent the slower (but more accurate) cortical system as the integration of sensory evidence over time until a certain level of confidence is reached. We then consider how two such systems should be combined optimally for a range of information linkage mechanisms. We conclude with some performance predictions that will hold if our representation is realistic.

    References