Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Restricted accessReview article

Perceptuo-motor interactions in the perceptual organization of speech: evidence from the verbal transformation effect

Anahita Basirat

Anahita Basirat

Gipsa-lab, Département Parole et Cognition, UMR 5216 CNRS, Grenoble,Université de Grenoble, France

CEA/SAC/DSV/DRM/I2BM/NeuroSpin, Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex, France

INSERM, Cognitive Neuroimaging Unit, Gif-sur-Yvette, France

[email protected]

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Jean-Luc Schwartz

Jean-Luc Schwartz

Gipsa-lab, Département Parole et Cognition, UMR 5216 CNRS, Grenoble,Université de Grenoble, France

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Marc Sato

Marc Sato

Gipsa-lab, Département Parole et Cognition, UMR 5216 CNRS, Grenoble,Université de Grenoble, France

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    The verbal transformation effect (VTE) refers to perceptual switches while listening to a speech sound repeated rapidly and continuously. It is a specific case of perceptual multistability providing a rich paradigm for studying the processes underlying the perceptual organization of speech. While the VTE has been mainly considered as a purely auditory effect, this paper presents a review of recent behavioural and neuroimaging studies investigating the role of perceptuo-motor interactions in the effect. Behavioural data show that articulatory constraints and visual information from the speaker's articulatory gestures can influence verbal transformations. In line with these data, functional magnetic resonance imaging and intracranial electroencephalography studies demonstrate that articulatory-based representations play a key role in the emergence and the stabilization of speech percepts during a verbal transformation task. Overall, these results suggest that perceptuo (multisensory)-motor processes are involved in the perceptual organization of speech and the formation of speech perceptual objects.

    Footnotes

    One contribution of 10 to a Theme Issue ‘Multistability in perception: binding sensory modalities’.

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